Wednesday, 18 October 2017
 

International Peace College South Africa

Based in Cape Town, the International Peace College South Africa offers undergraduate as well as postgraduate courses in Arabic, Islamic Studies and Islamic Law.

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International Peace College of South Africa

International Peace College of South Africa

URL: http://www.ipsa-edu.org



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Contact Information

IPSA Campus

Tel: +27 21 638 1121
Fax: +27 21 638 1790
Email: info@ipsauniversity.com

Address:
c/o Johnstone and Duine Rds
Rylands Estate
7764

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Places Near Here:
  1. Habibia Children's Home (0.04km)
  2. Kramat of Moulana Abdul Latief (0.08km)
  3. Habibia Soofi Mosque (0.1km)
  4. Habibia Primary School (0.19km)
  5. Gulf International Tours (0.56km)
  6. Nakhlistan (0.65km)
  7. Muslim Views (0.71km)

Recent Updates

    Nafisah Patel's response to Safiyyah Sutee

    Published by International Peace College South Africa on Friday, 25 November 2011
    This is Nafisah Patel's response to Safiyyah Surtee's presentation on "Women in the Middle: between hyper-liberalism and ultra-conservatism". Nafisah is a graduate of IPSA and is currently a postgraduate student in Religious Studies at the University of Cape Town.

    Safiyyah Surtee on Women in the Middle

    Published by International Peace College South Africa on Friday, 25 November 2011
    This was Safiyyah Surtee's presentation on "Women in the Middle: between hyper-liberalism and ultra-conservatism"" presented at the IPSA Spring Symposium held on the 20th Novemver 2011. Safiyyah is a postgraduate candidate and a part-time lecturer at the University of Johannesburg.

    Mufti Smith's response to Dr Toffar

    Published by International Peace College South Africa on Friday, 25 November 2011
    This is the response by Mufti Ebrahim Smith (of Darul Iftaa, Western Cape) to Dr Toffar's paper.

    Dr Toffar on "The Middle Way in Islamic Law: A principled flexibility"

    Published by International Peace College South Africa on Friday, 25 November 2011
    This is the paper delivered by Shaykh Dr Abdul Karriem Toffar, Dean of Islamic Studies at IPSA, at the IPSA Spring Symposium held on the 20th November 2011.

    MMB: middle way response

    Published by Voice of the Cape on Thursday, 24 November 2011
    The following paper delivered by Sh Ebrahim Smith of Darul Ifta was a response to Shaykh Dr Abdul Karriem Toffar of IPSA's paper The Middle Way in Islamic Law and was delivered at the International Peace College of South Africa (IPSA)'s Spring Symposium on Sunday 20 November.

    Al Wasatiya or seeking the middle way in Islamic affairs is indeed a commendable act. Almighty Allah has commanded us to seek the middle way in metaphysics and believe "Say:" O people of the Book! Exceed not in your religion the bounds' trespassing beyond the truth, nor follow the vain desires of people who went wrong in times gone by-who mislead many and strayed from the even Way". Maida 77

    MMB: the middle way

    Published by Voice of the Cape on Wednesday, 23 November 2011
    The following paper, entitled The Middle Way in Islamic Law - A Principled Flexibility by Sheik Abdul Karriem Toffar, was delivered at the International Peace College South Africa (IPSA)'s Spring Symposium on Sunday 20 November. This series is presently being aired during Open Lines.

    The shari`ah consist of two main sources, namely, the primary sources or original textual sources which are the revealed Qur'an and authentic Sunnah (prophetic precepts and practice). All major sects subscribe to this thought. Besides these, there is what is called supporting sources which are all based on ijtihad (considered juristic opinion of jurists) ranging from ijma` (consensus of various kinds) to the weakest form, al-istishab (presumption of continuity).

    IPSA probes wasatiyyah

    Published by Voice of the Cape on Sunday, 20 November 2011
    It was a full house on Sunday at the annual Spring Symposium held at the International Peace College of South Africa (IPSA) in conjunction with the Shah Mohamed Trust, where the issue of Charting the Middle Way in Islam Today was the main subject in focus. Held for the fourth consecutive year in Rylands, the symposium this year drew the strongest representation of women - up to a third - and was well represented by both academics, students, members of the ulema and ordinary Muslims, the oldest of whom was 90 years old.

    In his welcome, IPSA principal and deputy president of the Muslim Judicial Council (MJC), Sheik Igsaan Taliep, said the issue of wasatiyya - charting the middle way - was of pertinent importance to Muslims at this time, both in South Africa and abroad; more so for the graduates of IPSA who have been introduced to this concepts in the underlying theme of their study. With graduates expected to take positions of leadership in the community, it was all the more inportant for them to understand this approach, the alim said.

    Moderation in spotlight

    Published by Voice of the Cape on Saturday, 19 November 2011
    The response has been good for the International Peace College South Africa's (IPSA) annual Spring Symposium which takes place on Sunday in Athlone and this year looks at the issue of Charting the Middle Way in Islam Today. Presented at IPSA's campus in Johnson Road, Rylands, the annual symposium is a joint venture with the Shah Mohamed Trust.

    According to Dr Auwais Rafudeen, director of the Institute for the Study of Current Islam, there has been a healthy response to the symposium and thus far over 100 people have confirmed their attendance. He explained that the event traditionally draws a large number of academics, but there was equal interest among general members of the public.

    The Hajj: Its significance and relevance to us

    Published by International Peace College South Africa on Tuesday, 1 November 2011
    For the next few days our representatives on Hajj, whether relatives/friends/neighbors, or the hujjāj in general, will participate in one of the greatest annual events in human history. They will complete the rituals whose origins go way back beyond the time of Prophet Muḥammad (SAW), to the time of Nabī Ibrāhīm (AS), and even further back to the time of Nabī Ādam (AS). During these momentous days, pilgrims will remove their normal clothing, removing all outer signs of nationality, wealth and social status where everyone wears the same simple sheets of white cloth (Ihrām).